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Swedish Visiting Cake Bars Day 3 of 12 Days of Cookies

Swedish Visiting Cake Bars Day 3 of 12 Days of Cookies

If you like almonds you are going to LOVE this cookie. A crispy almond topping layered on a chewy slightly dense cake. Perfect with a cup of tea. A nice addition to any cookie tray. Try to find the thinnest sliced almonds possible, they seem […]

Mighty Mouse? No, Mighty Jamie To Save the Day (12 Days of Cookies)

Mighty Mouse? No, Mighty Jamie To Save the Day (12 Days of Cookies)

My Christmas present arrived early this year.  The twins are home!  Lucky for me Jamie is in a baking mood and immediately tackled one of our favorite cookie books, Dorie’s Cookies.  So, without further ado… Heeeeeere’s Jamie with Day 3, 4, and 5 of our […]

Attention Java Junkies! Coffee Malteds: Day 5 of 12 Days of Cookies

Attention Java Junkies! Coffee Malteds: Day 5 of 12 Days of Cookies

Coffee Malteds from Dorie’s Cookies a great cookie for all Java Junkies and even those that aren’t coffee lovers.  The addition of malted milk powder adds a nutty, vanilla, earthy flavor-a touch of Ovaltine in your cookie. To take them over the top, Jamie dipped them in chocolate, genius!

Coffee Malteds from Dorie's Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups (204gms) all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup (40gms) unflavored malted milk powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup (100gms) sugar
  • 1/4 cup (50gms) packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground coffee, preferably from espresso beans (or use instant or powdered coffee or espresso)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Preheat it to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.
  • Whisk the flour, malt powder, and baking powder together.
  • In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter, both sugars, espresso, and salt together on medium speed until well blended, about 3 minutes. Scrape down the bowl, return to medium speed and, one by one, beat in the egg, yolk, and vanilla, beating for 1 minute after each goes in.
  • Turn off the mixer, add the dry ingredients all at once and pulse, just to begin incorporating the flour and malt powder. When the risk of flying flour is passed, mix on low speed only until the dry ingredients disappear into the dough. You'll have a rather crumbly dough, but that's fine. Give the dough a few last turns with a sturdy flexible spatula and then reach in, knead if necessary and gather the dough into a ball.
  • Using a small cookie scoop, scoop out level portions of dough, or use a teaspoon to get rounded spoonfuls. Roll the dough into balls and place them an inch apart on the lined baking sheets.
  • Bake the cookies for 14 minutes, rotating the baking sheets top to bottom and front to back after 8 minutes. The cookies will be soft and golden only around the edges; they won't look done, and they're not—they'll firm as they cool. Transfer the sheets to racks and then, after about 10 minutes, carefully lift the cookies onto the racks to cool completely.
  • Do Ahead
  • Packed in a tightly covered container, the cookies will keep for up to 3 days (after that, they get firmer and are perfect for dunking...in coffee, of course). Wrapped airtight, they can be frozen for up to 2 months.
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Ho Ho Ho! Yo-Yo’s are here! Day 2 Holiday Cookies

Ho Ho Ho! Yo-Yo’s are here! Day 2 Holiday Cookies

Day 2 of 12 days of Cookies.  I am off to a slow start having posted the first cookie days ago.  But I promise, this cookie will make up for the wait.  Once again I found a delicious treat in Ottolenghi’s dessert book, Sweet. Yep, my […]

Stuck on Sticky Rice (Gnaw Mai Fan)

Stuck on Sticky Rice (Gnaw Mai Fan)

When the holidays roll around and the feasting begins, you can find me eyeing the array of side dishes on the table.  Yep, scoop me some sweet potatoes, pour on the creamed spinach and pile on the mashed potatoes. While everyone oohs and ahs over […]

There’s Always Room for J-E-L-L-O

There’s Always Room for J-E-L-L-O

Do Not Laugh.  Yes, this is a recipe for jello, not the boxed Jello you made with your mom when you were a kid (your job-pour the contents into a big bowl), oh no. The Asian version of Jello, Almond Jello. So good, it brings a whole new dimension to Jello. It’s delicious, light and refreshing.  If you have ever had a meal in a Chinese restaurant which served a dessert other than fortune cookies, it might have been Almond Jello.  Unfortunately, much of the Almond Jello served in restaurants isn’t very good.  I have a theory, LOTS of Asians are lactose intolerant so milk is used sparingly.  Well, that’s what makes Almond Jello YUMMY, the addition of milk-like the white layers of finger jello or the cream cheese in that funky but delicious Lime and Pineapple Jello Ring that everyone’s aunt (who couldn’t cook) brought to every potluck. Jello with Moo-magic.

When I was a kid the fanciest restaurant in Chinatown was The Empress of China. In its heyday celebrities and politicians clamored there.  My folks would take us there for very special occasions-birthday dinners for grandparents, wedding banquets and Chinese New Year. High on the 6th floor, it had the most breathtaking views of the City and the East Bay.  I loved the Green Jade Mist Almond Delight, their version of Almond Jello.  Served in a goblet with a touch of Creme de Menthe it was the glitzy ending to a fancy meal.

Typically Almond Jello is topped with fruit, not creme de menthe.  You can use mandarin oranges or fruit cocktail (when is the last time you had fruit cocktail out of a can? Strictly nostalgic choice) or Lychees. Use fruit packed in light syrup or its own juice.  I add the syrup or juice to the jello so it just slides down your throat, like having jello soup. Confession, I loved pouring milk on my jello, same effect. Canned fruit makes it a great winter dessert when fresh fruit can be hard to find. You could jazz it up seasonally by adding fresh strawberries or blueberries.  This recipe makes a soft jello which I happen to like. If you like jello that has the consistency of finger jello, reduce the amount of the water in the recipe to 3/4 cup of each and the milk to 2 cups.

When I was pregnant with my oldest, my craving was Almond Jello.  I made vats of it, doubling, tripling, even quadrupling the recipe. Seriously, it was like gestational crack.

These days I make Almond Jello when my oldest kid comes home.  He loves it. If I don’t steal a couple of scoops before I let him know there is a bowl in the fridge, I will have lost my window of opportunity to have some.

It’s stupid easy, so delicious.   Try it, who doesn’t like jello?


Almond Jello

Ingredients

  • 2 packets gelatin
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar (you an adjust the sugar to the sweetness of your liking)
  • 2 1/4-2 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 2 teaspoons almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1 15 ounce can of Mandarin oranges packed light syrup

Instructions

  • Put cold water in a mixing bowl.
  • Sprinkle gelatin on surface of cold water. Let it sit for one minute
  • Add sugar and stir.
  • Add hot water and stir until completely dissolved. (I cheat, if it doesn't look fully dissolved, zap it for 15 seconds in the microwave)
  • Stir in milk and extracts. Pour mixture into individual serving bowls or 1 large glass bowl such as a souffle dish
  • Chill until firm (at least 2-3 hours)
  • Cut jello into cubes if desired. Top with mandarin oranges
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Twelve Days of Cookies Starts… NOW (Saffron, Orange and Honey Madeleines)

Twelve Days of Cookies Starts… NOW (Saffron, Orange and Honey Madeleines)

This holiday season I am determined to post a Twelve Days of Cookies list and I will only stand a chance if I start now. This month Food 52 Baking Club is featuring Ottolenghi’s book Sweet authored with Helen Goh, his dessert partner in crime. […]

Food Porn (Kristen Kish Cooking)

Food Porn (Kristen Kish Cooking)

I recently received Top Chef Winner Kristen Kish’s beautiful book, Kristen Kish Cooking: Recipes and Techniques from Blogging for Books. Right off the bat I am going to say I am torn. It is a DROP DEAD GORGEOUS book and I am in love with […]

Asian Soul Food (Steamed Pork Patty with Salted Duck Egg)

Asian Soul Food (Steamed Pork Patty with Salted Duck Egg)

In Asian speak, this is how we say I love you…

“Have you eaten yet?”

When my kids come home I get busy in the kitchen making EVERY SINGLE DISH they love. From Soup to dessert I make their favorites. I usually have a pot of chili or spaghetti sauce simmering on the stove while they’re home and I pull out my Dad’s recipes for down-home Chinese dishes. Wes makes short rib stew and carrot cake. It’s 24-7 cooking and eating.  What can I say?  The Asian language of love is food.
My dad and grandfather were the cooks in my family.  My grandfather cooked for a living.  Before going off to work we would often have early dinner with him. Always Chinese food,  I was surprised when I found out later he was a line chef at Original Joe’s on Broadway and also at the famed Tonga Room at the Fairmont Hotel. For my Dad cooking was a passion. Both made down-home dishes like steamed pork patty with salted duck egg, hairy melon soup, steamed chicken with lop cheung (Chinese sausage) and black mushrooms, or whole fish (yes,that means the head too) with green onions and ginger.  I savored eating these dishes and watching them prepare them.  When I went off to school in Los Angeles, I would often call home to ask my Dad how to cook a favorite childhood dish. It was my connection with home and family and a way to keep them close.

A flurry of cooking this past week while the boys were home and the multiple “how do you make” calls from Jamie (who was stuck in Houston) prompted me to add a new section to 3Jamigos. I call it Soul Food.  It’s down-home cooking, cherished recipes to share with family and friends.  Hope you will try some.  Or if you would like to share a family favorite, I would love to post it on my blog.

My inaugural post for Soul Food is a down-home favorite, savory steamed pork patty with salted duck egg. You can find it in hole-in-the-wall Cantonese (southern China) restaurants or if you get invited over for family dinner at any of your Cantonese friends’ homes. The ground pork is seasoned with soy sauce, oyster sauce and topped with the salted duck egg. Think of this as a version of a sausage patty topped with a fried egg.  See, not so strange after all.  My kids scoop up chunks of the patty and egg and mix it into their rice. Yum.

Things they don’t tell you in cookbooks.  Although simple to make, there are pearls of kitchen wisdom on how to prepare this dish.  First, the pork.  My mom would tell me to buy pork butt or shoulder and hand-chop the pork at home, better texture.  The pork itself should not be too lean as the fat adds flavor and keeps it from drying out.  This primer on pork pretty much holds for any dish that requires ground pork-don’t buy pre-ground (ok, I cheat-there is a coarse ground version in Chinese markets).

Raw salted duck eggs are hard to find.  I was really excited when I found local salted duck eggs at Marina Foods from Metzer Farms.  Great quality. The eggs are brined in a salt solution for approximately a month. At the end of the month, the yolk has hardened, the white has a gelatin-like consistency, and the egg has a wonderful briny flavor that goes well with pork.

When mixing the seasonings and egg into the pork, stir in ONE DIRECTION only.  So pick, clockwise or counter-clockwise and stick with it.  DON’T ASK ME WHY (ok, I googled it, supposedly it keeps the meat tender).  Beside that’s what my Dad told me to do.

Place seasoned pork in a glass pie plate, smooshing it around the plate.  Fill a Chinese rice bowl 1/3-1/2 full with HOT water.  Slowly pour the hot water into the pork, stirring and breaking up the pork further.  The final mixture will be loose and wet looking. Slice the yolk of the duck egg into slivers or slices. A word of warning, it will be a little slimy feeling.  Place the slivers of yolk on top of the pork distributed evenly around the patty.  Top with green onions.  Place in steamer and steam over medium-high heat for about 15 minutes.

Just before serving, garnish with more green onions or cilantro and a drizzle of oyster sauce.  Serve with bowl of rice!

Steamed Pork Patty with Salted Duck Egg

Ingredients

  • 3/4 Pound Ground Pork
  • 1 Egg, large
  • 1 Salted Duck Egg
  • 1/4-1/3 Rice Bowl Of hot water (approximately 1/2 cup)
  • 2 tsp. Soy Sauce
  • 1 tsp oyster sauce
  • 2 tsp rice wine or sherry or sake
  • 1/2 Tsp. Sugar
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • Dash of white pepper
  • Green Onions And Cilantro

Instructions

  • Separate duck egg yolk from white. Reserve the yolk.
  • Mix whole egg with the salted duck egg white.
  • Combine pork with egg mixture and seasonings, stirring together (stir in one direction).
  • Place In a glass pie plate. Slowly add hot water to mixture, scrambling mixture as you add the water to loosen the mixture. It will look soupy.
  • Garnish With reserved egg yolk that has been cut Into slices.
  • Steam For 12-15 minutes. Should not be pink at all.
  • Top With Cilantro And Oyster Sauce If Desired.
  • Serve with rice, lots of rice.
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